How to Rotate Tires



Rotating tires means changing the position of your vehicle tires regularly. Tire rotation is important to increase the lifespan of tires and to ensure a safe and smooth ride. Without tire rotation, tires wear unevenly, which can lead to premature tire damage.

For the best results, tires need to be rotated according to their pattern. Given here are the ways to rotate your tires depending on their pattern. If you want some expert intervention for your Mitsubishi tires, you can always visit our Kelly Mitsubishi dealership in Emmaus, PA. We offer Mitsubishi service for the nearby towns of Philadelphia, Allentown, and Easton.

Tires with a Uni-Directional Pattern

Tires with a set uni-directional pattern are called directional tires. In such tires, the tread pattern is uni-directional, meaning that it is optimized for only one specific direction, either right or left. This direction is specified using arrows or triangles on the sidewall of directional tires.

Rotating directional tires usually involves the following:

  • The front tire on the right is swapped with the back tire on the right.
  • The front tire on the left is swapped with the back tire on the left.

Tires with No Specific Directional Pattern

These tires are called non-directional tires. They feature a tread pattern that is not optimized for any specific direction. Therefore, these tires offer consistent performance regardless of the direction they are driven.

A cross pattern is usually performed to rotate non-directional tires. Rotation also depends on whether your vehicle is a rear-wheel or front-wheel drive.

If you are using a rear-wheel drive, then:

  • Switch front tires in a direction opposite to the rear.
  • The tire on the left side of the vehicle front takes the right position on the back of the vehicle.
  • The tire on the right side of the vehicle front tire takes the position of the left tire on the vehicle rear.
  • Tires originally on the back take straightforward positions, meaning the rear left tire takes the left position in the front.
  • The right tire on the back takes the right position in the front.

If you are using a front-wheel drive, then the opposite of the above holds:

  • The right tire on the back of the vehicle takes the position of the left tire in the front.
  • The left tire on the back end takes the position of the right tire in the front.
  • The tires originally in the front are rotated in a straightforward manner, meaning the right tire in the front takes the place of the right tire in the back. The left tire in the front takes the place of the left tire in the back.

Tire rotation is usually performed for every 3, 000 to 5, 000 miles. Refer to your vehicle manual for the exact rotation period.

Source: Mitsubishi